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Co-Present Film Festival (session 6) : Prisons Real & Imagined, Schedule

Co-Present Film Festival (session 6) : Prisons Real & Imagined, Schedule

Posted by on Nov 19, 2013 in Featured, Projects |

The sixth session of the Co-Present Film Festival will take place on Saturday, November 30th. The schedule is listed below. Watch with us from anywhere in the world at any time throughout the run. Watch on your own. Communicate through the #CPFF6 hashtag on Twitter. We’ll sync our clocks just before the first start time by using the World Clock. If you can’t join us on the 30th, we’ll announce the date for the December session soon. In December, I’ll begin posting the films for 2014.   THE SCHEDULE :   BEGIN 700am MST / 900am EDT / 200pm GMT / 300pm CET / 600pm GST THE LIVES OF OTHERS (Das Leben der Anderen) One sentence summary: Listen in on the lives of East German residents. IMDB Link Wikipedia Link   approx. 915am MST / 1115am EDT / 415pm GMT / 515pm CET / 815pm GST 15 minute break   930am MST / 1130am EDT / 430pm GMT / 530pm CET / 830pm GST BRAZIL One sentence summary: Man, machines, dystopia, and whimsy all wrap up into an individual, epic tale. IMDB Link Wikipedia Link Please note that there were two versions released. We will be watching the longer, 132-minute version.   approx. 1145am MST / 145pm EDT / 645pm GMT / 745pm CET / 1045pm GST 15 minute break   1200pm MST / 200pm EDT / 700pm GMT / 800pm CET / 1100pm GST INTO GREAT SILENCE (Die Große Stille) One sentence summary: Quietly view the everyday world of Carthusian monks of the Grande Chartreuse. IMDB Link Wikipedia Link   approx. 250pm MST / 450pm EDT / 950pm GMT / 1050pm CET / 150am GST –...

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Experiments : October/November

Posted by on Nov 18, 2013 in Projects |

From October 11th through November 11th, we of the FRC communicated to each other via images of found language posted on Twitter. A little bit exquisite corpse, a little bit triplets internal code, we used it as a way to start what will hopefully be an ongoing series of short experiments. You can check out the sequence on our Twitter account. I’ve compiled all 33 photos into one image; it reads left to right, top to bottom.       The text in the last image is a bit hard to read, so I repeat it...

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Co-Present Film Festival : Overview & What We’ve Learned So Far

Co-Present Film Festival : Overview & What We’ve Learned So Far

Posted by on Nov 8, 2013 in Featured, Projects |

We recently finished our 5th Co-Present Film Festival (CPFF). This means that we’ve held the monthly, single day events for 5(!) months. In that time, we’ve had a wonderful, growing dedicated base of watchers, and we’ve learned a lot as we continue to pursue some of our original questions. I hesitated to write a promised post about the origins of the CPFF because it’s deeply grounded in a whole morass of things that I’ve been thinking about for a long while. At its simplest, here’s the intention of the CPFF: We, as a group of watchers, are (mostly) in physical isolation. We watch films on various forms of isolation (hence the theme Prisons Real & Imagined), while physically isolated but virtually connected. We are isolated and connected, watching and discussing items that address isolation of various types. These elements inspired the format, instigated the theme, and inform my choice of films (both for inclusion and combination with one another within individual sessions). From the beginning, we’ve considered the CPFF to be a public experiment. What were our questions? Here are a few that we started with and continue to explore: . What films, and films in combination, could fuel meaningful conversations between the participants regarding issues of isolation and other topics? . What is the simplest setup that we can implement technologically that can successfully create a sense of connectivity between the participants? . How do we successfully span both locations and timezones through our planned timing for watching and technology used to enable discussion? . How do we balance a combination of public (Twitter hashtag) and private (backchannel chat) combination, and do we need to do so? What do we gain or lose by going completely public? What do we gain or lose by operating completely privately? Is there a balance between the two that can enable both wider discourse and create a space that feels safe for personal conversation? . How well do films with subtitles work as a part of the CPFF, when we are all already multi-tasking amongst multiple windows? . How do we support the growth of the community of watchers? Should we become...

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M&M&M Field Trip, Part II

M&M&M Field Trip, Part II

Posted by on Nov 2, 2013 in Featured, Fieldtrips, M&M&M |

After failing to see the Bulgakov museums, the guide took my mother and I to Bulgakov’s burial site: the cemetery at Novodevichy Convent. It was opened in 1989 and is filled with the graves of important Soviet-era Russians. After a bit of searching–the place covers several acres of densely-packed markers below a cover of pine trees–we found Bulgakov’s gravestone. Bulgakov’s grave was completely unremarkable except for it’s rather lumpy appearance. I mention it only as an excuse to tell you about the rest of the cemetery, which was amazing. I’m a fan of cemeteries. I love seeing the care put into cutting stone before water jets and laser etching took the human hand out of the marking of graves. I love wandering around quiet parks, and cemeteries are made for quiet contemplation. I love the implied stories. And I love to see how different cultures honor their dead. I visited a pet cemetery on a private estate in Ireland that had small marble stones for each of their dogs, marked with a description of their personalities. I’ve visited small cemeteries next to tiny mission churches in New Mexico where the markers, exposed to the sun and the sky in a landscape without trees, feel small and lost. I’ve been to pauper’s graves marking unknown immigrants that died trying to cross the Arizona desert. And I’ve strolled along the stone-lined streets of the Buenos Ares cemetery that resembled a tiny urban city with rows intricately-formed sarcophagi lining the streets. The New Maiden’s Cemetery at first glance looked like many I had visited before, in deep shade with neatly-tended lanes of unique markers. But I’ve never seen anything like it: an atheist cemetery. (That’s not precisely true. There is an occasional cross–Gogol’s grave, which was moved to the cemetery, has one, though apparently his marker has gone through several changes over the decades–or other religious marker.) It’s a cemetery dedicated to honor individual’s contribution to the state. Military cemeteries honor service to a country, but the lines of identical markers make an individual grave melt into the mass, reinforcing their role of of one among thousands. And even these graves, set...

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