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Co-Present Film Festival (session 4 – Mamoru Oshii-a-thon) : Prisons Real & Imagined, Schedule

Co-Present Film Festival (session 4 – Mamoru Oshii-a-thon) : Prisons Real & Imagined, Schedule

Posted by on Aug 27, 2013 in Projects |

The fourth session of the Co-Present Film Festival will take place on Saturday, September 21st. We’re holding a Mamoru Oshii-a-thon, in honor of the influential Japanese anime director. The schedule is listed below. Watch with us from anywhere in the world at any time throughout the run. Watch on your own. Communicate through the #CPFF4 hashtag on Twitter. We’ll sync our clocks just before the first start time by using the World Clock. If you can’t join us on the 21st, we’ll be announcing films and dates for the October – December sessions soon, and films for the rest of the year are listed here.   THE SCHEDULE :   Begin 430pm CET / 330pm GMT / 1030am EDT / 730am MDT GHOST IN THE SHELL One sentence summary: Seminal anime film confronts what it means to be human, machine, real, & imagined. IMDB Link Wikipedia Link Note: We’ll be watching Version 2.0, the 2008 re-release.   approx. 600pm CET / 500pm GMT / 1200am EDT / 900am MDT – 15 minute break   615pm CET / 515pm GMT / 1215am EDT / 915am MDT AVALON One sentence summary: Oshii’s first live-action film sets a MMORPG in post-war Poland. IMDB Link Wikipedia Link   approx. 8pm CET / 7pm GMT / 2pm EDT / 11am MDT – 15 minute break   815pm CET / 715pm GMT / 215pm EDT / 1115am MDT ASSAULT GIRLS One sentence summary: This somewhat of a sequel to Avalon sets battles fought by meticulously styled players in a Tank Girl style neverwhere. IMDB Link Wikipedia Link   approx. 930pm CET / 830pm GMT / 330pm EDT / 1230pm MDT – 15 minute break   945pm CET / 845pm GMT / 345pm EDT / 1245pm MDT SKY CRAWLERS One sentence summary: In a world otherwise in peace, children bred to be fighter pilots called kildren enact a game of war in the sky. IMDB Link Wikipedia Link   approx. 1145pm CET / 1045pm GMT / 545pm EDT / 245pm MDT –...

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Outside In

Outside In

Posted by on Aug 17, 2013 in Featured |

The Barbican in London (home to the Rain Room earlier this year) is trying something completely different: An open call to lots and lots of creative….whatever. Apparently the more random, the more hack-y the better. It’s on now through the end of August, which means that I’ll have to rely on others to tell me if the reality matches up to the rhetoric. Here’s the description from the Hack the Barbican website: Throughout August 2013 we are taking over the Barbican’s cavernous foyer spaces and filling them with 100 discipline-bending installations, performances, workshops and discussions. A half-size recreation of the Barbican’s biggest penthouse provides a social hub and stage for performances and talks. Site-specific projects are hijacking areas of the Barbican’s brutalist interior and converting them into games, performances and installations. The projects bring together theatre performers, computer scientists, sculptors, hardware hackers, teachers, musicians and everything in between. Marking a radical departure from conventional arts events Hack the Barbican has been organised without any central curation or commissioning. Taking inspiration from hacker culture the project has been developed over a period of six months through weekly sessions open to everyone. The project community has grown to 300 people spanning all disciplines, ages and backgrounds. Each project hosted at Hack the Barbican is completely self-resourced, with its creators acting entrepreneurially to secure the materials and skills they need. Think of it as a slowly growing city that is gradually taking over the Barbican’s public spaces, with many imperfections, but also many moments of unexpected magic. Here’s the open call (now [mostly] closed): Calling all artists, startups, musicians, hackers, dancers, film-makers, theatre performers, fashion designers and other creative types. What new work would you develop if you had your own workspace inside the world-famous Barbican Centre for a couple of days, a week or even a whole month? Now’s your chance! Applications are now invited for project residencies at Hack The Barbican, which will run from 5th to 31st August 2013. No matter if you’re a world-famous artist, a web startup, an engineering student or an accountant who makes things in their spare time. Every project will be considered on the same...

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Middle of Nowhere

Middle of Nowhere

Posted by on Aug 16, 2013 in Featured |

I’ve started reading Edward Abbey’s Desert Solitaire, and a question popped into my head that I don’t think I’ve asked myself before: What’s the farthest away I’ve ever been from another person? A quick mental shuffle through my life left me with two possibilities: either somewhere along I-10 in West Texas on a solo road trip, or during a family hike in the Superstition Mountains during a summer hailstorm when I headed down the mountain angry and alone. I can’t be sure what the distance would be for either options 1 or 2, but I suspect it was no more than 2 or 3 miles at the most. If you take the US population as 310 million and the area of the country as 3.8 million square miles, that leaves each of us a little more than .1 acres each, so I was far beyond the average for the country, if not my state. This nifty US census map shows where we all live: That one question led to a list of other questions I’ll never be able to answer: Where is the place you can get that’s farthest away from another human? Is it in the middle of an ocean? What was the farthest away a person ever got from everyone else before motorized transit? What would a US vacation population map look like? What’s the farthest away from another person you can get in NYC? Is that place open to the public? What would a map of places people have been (set foot) look like? What would a real-time map of everyone’s location look like? (maybe this last one will have an answer) Abbey was (probably) buried in or around the Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge. Southwest Arizona, which looks like one of the remotest and emptiest areas you’ll find anywhere in the lower 48, is now a major corridor for undocumented border crossings. The remoteness offers the possibility of an unnoticed passage and with it the danger of a solitary death from dehydration, heat, or injury. Recreational hikers are now warned away from the area because of the possibility of encountering interactions between drug runners and...

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Too Many Turtles

Posted by on Aug 12, 2013 in Uncategorized |

BLDGBLOG wrote a piece yesterday about feral turtles’ slow invasion of England’s Lake District 25 years after the comic’s heyday. An population of real unwanted creatures created through fans’ enthusiasm for a group of fantastical unwanted creatures. I want to take the real turtles and somehow make them fantastic...

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